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rcolon65 Profile
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Registered: 11-2005
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I am a new retiree now relocated in Panama for almost seven months and I am not aware of all the intricate procedures regarding inmigration laws in this country. For the past five months I have been comtemplating coming out of retirement and back to the work force since I am a young retiree and still capable of assisting this country with it's progress.

Where else can I obtain additional information regarding working in country.

thanks

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Retirement is good as long as you can enjoy it; what's hard is being a young retiree: only 40
11/16/2005, 8:44 am Link to this post Send Email to rcolon65   Send PM to rcolon65 Blog
 
susangg Profile
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Registered: 11-2005
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Re: Question


Well, you should probably consult an attorney about your residency visa options. It depends on what kind of visa you have. If you have a married-to-a-Panamanian visa, its my understanding that you can get a work permit. If you are a pensionado, you absolutely can't get a work permit. (But of course, that doesn't stop you from starting a business, hiring Panamanians, and taking "profits" even though you cannot pay yourself a "salary.") Anybody, resident, tourist, whatever, can start a business, with very few exceptions (retail and certain professions).

If you are still here as a tourist, and someone has offered you a job and can demonstrate to the satisfaction of the government that a Panamanian cannot be found with the skills to do the job, or if your prospective employer is in one of those special "enterprise zones," or has gotten permission to hire foreigners for his business, you might be able to get a work permit and temporary residence as an employee of that company. This would be a question for the company that is proposing to hire you. They should know all this before they offer you a job. It's kind of a case-by-case thing. And from what I hear, depends a lot on how well "comnected" the business is. But if that works out for you, you can always work as long as the job holds out and then apply for a pensionado or other visa if you are eligible when its over.

11/16/2005, 9:37 am Link to this post Send Email to susangg   Send PM to susangg
 


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